Leaving Pets in a Hot Car Can Be Deadly

During the summer people love to take their pets on errands with them, and I am no exception, however people need to take into account the temperature outside and leave them at home when it’s hot.  Even a quick stop into the store can cause death to your dog.  Below is some important information that can save your pets life.

“On an 80 degree day, the temperature in a car can rise to 120 degrees in just 10 minutes. Parking in the shade and leaving the windows open does not help nor does it change the fact that a dog’s body cannot tolerate extreme heat. They do not sweat like people do ~ dogs pant and sweat through the nose and the pads on their feet. If a dog’s temperature reaches 106 degrees the damage it suffers internally may be irreversible. Dogs with short noses (Pugs, Bulldogs), those that are overweight, very young or very old, long haired or dark in color are at greater risk.

Signs of heat stroke include heavy panting, dark red gums, thick saliva, dry mucus membranes, dizziness or disorientation, inability to stand, collapse and/or loss of consciouness. A heat stroke in dogs can develop into a potentially deadly situation in as little as 20 minutes ~ if your dog shows any of these signs it requires immediate medical attention. 

You can help cool your overheated dog on the way to the vet by placing cool (not cold), wet towels on its body ~ particularly around the head, stomach, and foot pads. Cold water will constrict the blood vessels and can cause further overheating. Offer your dog water to drink, but do not force it into your dog’s mouth. ~ The Examiner”

If you see a pet in distress inside a vehicle, call 911 for help.

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Elevated Dog Bowls Help Prevent Bloat

Elevated Dog BowlUsing an elevated dog bowl reduces the air your dog ingests while eating and drinking.  This in turn helps avoid stomach bloat which is the second leading cause of death in dogs.

“In bloat (dilatation), due to a number of different and sometimes unknown reasons, the stomach fills up with air and puts pressure on the other organs and diaphragm. The pressure on the diaphragm makes it difficult for the dog to breathe. The air-filled stomach also compresses large veins in the abdomen, thus preventing blood from returning to the heart. Filled with air, the stomach can easily rotate on itself, thus pinching off its blood supply. Once this rotation (volvulus) occurs and the blood supply is cut off, the stomach begins to die and the entire blood supply is disrupted and the animal’s condition begins to deteriorate very rapidly. ” PetEducation.com

Secondly, it allows our dogs to eat at a more natural level which reduces the strain on the neck, back muscles, and joints.  The height from these feeders allows a dog to stand more naturally, eliminating the need for dogs to crouch down.  This is especially beneficial for larger dogs, seniors or dog with arthritis.

Elevated Dog BowlsLastly, an elevated dog bowl will keep their eating area cleaner.  At Pawsitively Elegant (www.4petswithstyle.com) you can purchase a custom made feeder in your choice of height, color, dog embellishments, number of bowls, etc.  They are not only beautiful and enhance your home, but they are also healthier for your dog.  Whether you have show dogs, are a celebrity that lavishes your pets, or someone who has a rescue dog … these elevated dog bowls would be a great addition to your home.

Since our items are one-of-a-kind we always invite custom orders.  For your convenience we take Visa, Mastercard and Discover as well as PayPal.

Pet Friendly Getaways

More than 75 percent of Americans would take their pet on every vacation — if only they could — a recent survey by the American Automobile Association and Best Western International found. Not only that, almost 30 percent of traveling pet-owners said they would choose their pets over their significant others as a traveling companion — if only they could.

But more than half of those traveling pet-owners said it was difficult to find pet-friendly accommodations. And since almost 75 percent of pet-inclusive vacations involve visiting friends or family, there’s often more at stake than just fun getaways.

Although it’s fashionable for establishments to bill themselves as “pet-friendly,” some are more pet-friendly than others. For instance, some will not accept felines, or dogs over a certain weight. Some establishments limit how many pets can be lodged in a room, or charge additional fees for or deposits for accommodating pets.

Some hotels don’t allow pets on the beds, and provide pet beds instead. Some hotels don’t permit guests to leave pets unattended; some do for short periods; and some even provide a pet-sitting service.

Though pet policies can be found on hotel or pet travel web sites, the information can be incomplete or outdated. Hotels may alter their pet policies from one month to the next, so make sure their pet-friendly policy is still in place before toting the pet along.

Here are some of our favorite pet-friendly destinations if you’re planning a trip this month:

http://www.petvr.com/